Recent Storm Damage Posts

Learn About What SERVPRO Can Do for You During Flu Season

2/7/2020 (Permalink)

Help prevent the spread of flu germs! Homes, businesses, hospitals and schools can depend on SERVPRO of Midland/Gladwin Counties to clean and sanitize building materials, surfaces and contents following restoration industry standards, using professional cleaning products and EPA-registered cleaners and disinfectants.

Our trusted source for decontamination is our Bactericidal Viricidal Fogging Service. Bactericidal/Viricidal fogging effectively kills 99.9999% of bacteria, spores, viruses, fungi and mold to include MRSA, Norovirus and C-Diff., on pre-cleaned hard surfaces. As the dry mist fogging by-products are the benign elements water and oxygen, the process will not harm sensitive electronics, surfaces or substrates. The area is dry, decontaminated, and safe after use.

SERVPRO is a member of EPA’s Design for Environment (DfE) program, which evaluates human health and environmental concerns associated with traditional and alternative chemicals and processes in a range of industries. These evaluations and analyses empower businesses to select safer chemicals and technologies and allow chemical formulators a resource to create products using environmentally friendly raw materials.

SERVPRO of Midland/Gladwin Counties are also trained and equipped to clean your HVAC and duct systems to help provide better air quality and help reduce the risk of circulating harmful contaminants.

Protecting Your Pets from Winter Weather

12/11/2019 (Permalink)

Michigan winters are known to be bitter cold, wet and long. As you prepare for these new few months, make sure you are thinking about your furry family members too. Just like humans, our furry family members need to be safe and prepared during the winter months.

SERVPRO® of Midland/Gladwin Counties know that your pets mean the world to you and we want to provide you with tips for the winter to keep them safe.

  • Limit outdoor time on bitter cold days. Under no circumstances should pets be left outdoors for long periods of time. Be aware of your pet’s tolerance for cold weather and adjust accordingly. Pets are susceptible to frostbite and hypothermia just like humans.
  • Never shave your pet down in the winter. A longer coat will provide extra warmth for your furry family member. It will also minimize the chances of clinging ice balls, salt crystals and de-icing chemicals that can dry the skin.
  • Wipe their Paws: When coming back inside from being out in the cold, always wipe your pet’s paws. Streets and sidewalks are usually treated with salt or de-icers that can irritate your pet’s paws. Salt and de-icers can also be toxic, which can be dangerous if your pet were to lick their paws.
  • Paw Check: Check your pets paws frequently for signs of cold weather damage and injury, like cracked paw pads or bleeding.
  • Avoid the Ice: Pets can slip and fall just like humans can. More importantly, our pets don’t know the dangers of breaking through ice on frozen water. Always keep your pet on a leash during the winter to be stay clear from danger.

Remember, if it’s too cold for you, it’s probably too cold for your pet too. Warm pets are happy pets.

It’s Time to Winterize Your Summer Home

11/20/2019 (Permalink)

Unfortunately, it will be awhile until we see summer again. Winter has taken over Michigan and it is going to be a long season. Now is the time to start winterizing your summer home if you haven’t done so already!

Winter storms can be damaging to all homes, especially those that are vacant during the winter months. Proper care and frequent check ins can help prevent your summer home from a disaster. Follow these steps to winterize your summer home:

  • To avoid facing any last-minute obstacles, evaluate the condition of the property. Be sure to examine the exterior closely by checking the foundation and checking siding and trim for cracks and crevices. If you notice that repairs need to be made, get it done before as soon as possible.
  • Clean the gutters. Clean the gutters to make sure that rain and snowmelt can run away from the base of your house.
  • Inspect the roof. Check your roof for any raised shingles. If there are signs of damage, make the needed repairs. Be sure to inspect the eaves, where the roof ledge meets the house.
  • Shut off power and gas. Electricity should be shut off at the main, leaving only circuits that control necessities like an alarm system. Shut off all appliances to prevent possible damage cause by lightning. Gas should be turned off at the main as well. To play it safe, have the service temporarily suspended for the winter months.
  • Shut off water supply. All the water pipes in your home should be drained. After turning off your water supply, drain your pipes of all water by opening faucets and flushing toilets to clear the water from the tank and bowl.
  • Make your summer home unattractive to pests. Clean your summer home thoroughly to help discourage new “residents” from moving right in. Clean, defrost and unplug refrigerators and freezers. Also, be sure to wipe them dry and leaving doors open to prevent mildew. Inspect your home for openings that animals could enter.
  • Be ready for emergencies.
    • Install smoke detectors on every floor of your summer home.
    • Ask a trusted friend or neighbor to keep an eye out for emergency situations
    • Be aware of roof dams.

The last thing you want is to walk into your vacation home after a long winter just to find a disaster has hit. Be aware of the potential hazards that could affect your home during the winter.

For more information on winterizing your summer home, contact SERVPRO of Midland/Gladwin Counties.

Signs of Winter Storm Damage

11/15/2019 (Permalink)

Winter is here whether we like it or not! Michigan winters are more than just shoveling snow. With Michigan winters come frigid temperatures, excessive ice and snowstorms. You never know what a winter in the mitten state will bring you.

These storms and temperatures can cause extensive damage to your home. But, SERVPRO of Midland/Gladwin Counties is ready to help you if you experience a Michigan winter disaster from common issues including the following:

Frozen Pipes:

Frigid temperatures can cause pipes to freeze and break, which can lead to flooding in your home.

Ice Dams:

When snow melts unevenly and freezes at the edge of your roof, an ice dam is created which prevents melted snow from draining off the roof. The water can leak under the shingle and into your home, causing significant water damage.

Roof Damage:

Both snow and ice can damage your roof and could potentially cause the roof to collapse. Water can also get into cracks and expand when it freezes, causing larger cracks on your roof.

Michigan is no stranger when it comes to bitter winters. This weather can be extremely dangerous for your home if proper precautions are not made. Be sure to check your pipes and roof for sign of potential water damage. If you experience a winter storm disaster, SERVPRO of Midland/Gladwin Counties can restore your home “Like it never even happened.” Call us at 989-835-5015.  

When storms hit, we are ready for you!

4/5/2019 (Permalink)

About Us

SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin Counties specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition. 

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost. we are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit Midland ,MI  we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today(989)835-5015

We're entering storm season!

4/5/2019 (Permalink)

Do you know how to stay safe during an emergency?

  • Keep a disaster supply kit in the home, in your car and at your place of business.  It should include water, non perishable food items, A first aid kit, a radio and a flashlight with extra batteries 
  • Warm blankets or sleeping bags may also be a good idea in the winter months.
  • If a tornado watch is issued stay indoors away from windows, bring pets inside and listen to the radio for further updates.
  • If a tornado warning is issued seek shelter in the lowest floor of a sturdy building.

if damage does occur to your home or business call SERVPRO, We can make it "Like it never even happened."

Call SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin counties At (989)835-5015 for all your cleanup and restoration needs.

Storm Damage? We're There 24/7

3/28/2019 (Permalink)

When water comes from a clean source you can do some things to minimize the damage.  Here are some do's and dont's to get started on after you call SERVPRO.

DO

  • Remove excess water by mopping and blotting.
  • Wipe excess water from wood furniture after removal of lamps and tabletop items.
  • Remove and prop wet upholstery and cushions.
  • Place aluminum foil or wood blocks between furniture legs and wet carpeting.
  • Turn air conditioning on for maximum drying in summer.
  • Remove colored rugs from wet carpeting.
  • Remove art objects to a safe, dry place.
  • Gather loose items from floors

DON'T

  • Don't leave wet fabrics in place. Hang furs and leather goods.
  • Don't leave books, magazines or other colored items on wet carpet or floors.
  • Don't use your household vacuum to remove water.
  • Don't use television or other household appliances.
  • Don't turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet, and keep out of rooms where ceilings are sagging.

3 Services SERVPRO Provides After Storms

3/26/2019 (Permalink)

3 Services SERVPRO Provides

Demand for damage mitigation and restoration services spikes after a severe storm. Insurance agents and adjusters need to be able to rely on a local mitigation and restoration company to provide timely storm response services. Here are three services that make a local SERVPRO franchise the right choice for storm restoration.

1. Disaster Response

No matter how many properties are affected by a storm, a Disaster Response Team can arrive on each location within a matter of hours. Independent mitigation and restoration services are more likely to be backlogged than a national corporation that can dispatch employees and equipment from nearby franchises to areas that have experienced large losses.

2. Mitigation and Cleanup

The initial stage of storm response involves mitigating damage. In the case of structural damage, this may involve boarding up broken windows or breaches in a building envelope or tarping over a damaged roof. Standing water resulting from flood damage should be extracted as soon as possible. A full-service company can ensure that these initial measures contribute toward complete storm restoration.

3. All-In-One Restoration

A company that offers mitigation and restoration services can reduce the workload on insurance agents and adjusters while simplifying the claim process for property owners. Relying on a one-stop shop may make miscommunication less likely, prevent scheduling conflicts and allow for a faster and more thorough restoration job. Depending on a single service also means that the initial estimate is likely to be more accurate.

These storm restoration services set SERVPRO franchises apart from independent companies. The business model means that each location has the backing of a national corporation and the ability to call on nearby locations for additional personnel and equipment. A single estimate from a service that can clean up damage and rebuild a commercial property can also be more convenient for insurance agents, adjusters, and clients. 

It's almost winter in the Great Lakes Bay Region

11/13/2018 (Permalink)

Even when the snow flies we are here to help.
 

Before we know it our Great Lakes Bay Region will be blanketed with that white stuff.  Now we can't stop this from happening but SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin Counties would like to remind everyone of some of the dangers of snow.  

  • Accumulating snow can make driving motor vehicles very hazardous.
  • Visibility is reduced by falling snow and this is further exacerbated by strong winds creating whiteout conditions.
  • Heavy snowfall can immobilize a vehicle entirely, which may be deadly depending on how long it takes rescue crews to arrive. The clogging of a vehicle's tailpipe by snow may lead to carbon monoxide buildup inside the cabin
  • Snow buildup can weigh down a roof and cause trusses to cave in.
  • Snow piling up outside the house can block dryer vents or even some furnace exhaust vents causing dangerous fumes to enter your home.
  • Ice dams forming along the roof can create a backup of water to be forced up under your shingles.

So be safe out there this winter and if any of these thing happen to your home call us at (989)835-5015 and we will send a crew right over.

Fall weather can be wet and dangerous.

11/13/2018 (Permalink)

Only drive as fast as you feel comfortable with in bad weather.
Nearly half (47%) of all weather-related car accidents — more than 700,000 a year — are due to rain.


Here are 10 tips for driving in the rain:

Step 1. Exercise caution. Engine oil and grease build-up on roads and highways over time, and when combined with precipitation, you’ve got the equivalent of an automotive Slip ‘N Slide.

Step 2. Slow down. Wet pavement causes tires to lose traction and vehicles become more difficult to handle.

Step 3. Use headlights. Always use headlights in the rain – even if it’s just a sprinkle. Headlights help you see and be seen in wet weather.

Step 4. Keep your windshield wipers in tip-top shape. Summer can wreak havoc on your blades, so get them checked before fall’s showers arrive.

Step 5. Defog your windows. Precipitation can cause your windshield to quickly fog up, so use the front and rear defrosters to maximize visibility.

Step 6. Avoid pooling water. By splashing through puddles you can impair your vision and other drivers’. Additionally, standing water often shields potholes and debris from view and it can reduce the effectiveness of your vehicle’s brakes.

Step 7. If your car begins to hydroplane, do not brake or turn the wheel abruptly as this may cause your vehicle to go into a skid or spin. Take your foot off the gas and keep the wheel straight until your car reclaims traction.

Step 8. Increase your following distance. Slick roads, wet brakes and reduced visibility can lead to collisions. Give other vehicles plenty of room and brake early with reduced force.

Step 9. Don’t use cruise control. It can cause your car to accelerate when hydroplaning and reduces driver attentiveness.

Step 10. Drive in the tracks of the car in front of you. This allows the vehicle ahead to displace any standing water that’s on the road.

By employing these safe driving techniques you can keep yourself and your passengers safe during fall and winter drizzles and downpours. Rainy roads can be dangerous, but if we all slow down and use extra caution, rainy days might actually be a little brighter.

Michigan weather is extreme but not as bad as other areas of the country

4/10/2018 (Permalink)

Michigan has many different types of weather

There are many varieties and names for storms.  Luckily we do not experience all of these here in Michigan. 

  • Ice storm — Ice storms are one of the most dangerous forms of winter storms. When surface temperatures are below freezing, but a thick layer of above-freezing air remains aloft, rain can fall into the freezing layer and freeze upon impact into a glaze of ice. In general, 8 millimeters (0.31 in) of accumulation is all that is required, especially in combination with breezy conditions, to start downing power lines as well as tree limbs.Ice storms also make unheated road surfaces too slick to drive upon. Ice storms can vary in time range from hours to days and can cripple small towns and large urban centers alike.
  • Blizzard — There are varying definitions for blizzards, both over time and by location. In general, a blizzard is accompanied by gale-force winds, heavy snow (accumulating at a rate of at least 5 centimeters (2 in) per hour), and very cold conditions (below approximately −10 degrees Celsius or 14 F). Lately, the temperature criterion has fallen out of the definition across the United States
  • Snowstorm — A heavy fall of snow accumulating at a rate of more than 5 centimeters (2 in) per hour that lasts several hours. Snow storms, especially ones with a high liquid equivalent and breezy conditions, can down tree limbs, cut off power, and paralyze travel over a large region.
  • Coastal Storm — large wind waves and/or storm surge that strike the coastal zone. Their impacts include coastal erosion and coastal flooding
  • Ocean Storm — Storm conditions out at sea are defined as having sustained winds of 48 knots (55 mph or 90 km/h) or greater. Usually just referred to as a storm, these systems can sink vessels of all types and sizes.
  • Firestorm — Firestorms are conflagrations which attain such intensity that they create and sustain their own wind systems. It is most commonly a natural phenomenon, created during some of the largest bushfires, forest fires, and wildfires. The Peshtigo Fire is one example of a firestorm. Firestorms can also be deliberate effects of targeted explosives such as occurred as a result of the aerial bombings of DresdenNuclear detonations generate firestorms if high winds are not present.
  • Dust devil — a small, localized updraft of rising air.
  • Wind storm— A storm marked by high wind with little or no precipitation. Windstorm damage often opens the door for massive amounts of water and debris to cause further damage to a structure. European windstorms and derechos are two type of windstorms. High wind is also the cause of sandstorms in dry climates.
  • Squall — sudden onset of wind increase of at least 16 knots (30 km/h) or greater sustained for at least one minute.
  • Gale — An extra-tropical storm with sustained winds between 34–48 knots (39–55 mph or 63–90 km/h). 
  • Thunderstorm — A thunderstorm is a type of storm that generates lightning and the attendant thunder. It is normally accompanied by heavy precipitation. Thunderstorms occur throughout the world, with the highest frequency in tropical rain forest regions where there are conditions of high humidity and temperature along with atmospheric instability. These storms occur when high levels of condensation form in a volume of unstable air that generates deep, rapid, upward motion in the atmosphere. The heat energy creates powerful rising air currents that swirl upwards to the tropopause. Cool descending air currents produce strong down droughts below the storm. After the storm has spent its energy, the rising currents die away and down droughts break up the cloud. Individual storm clouds can measure 2–10 km across.
  • Tropical cyclone — A tropical cyclone is a storm system with a closed circulation around a center of low pressure, fueled by the heat released when moist air rises and condenses. The name underscores its origin in the tropics and their cyclonic nature. Tropical cyclones are distinguished from other cyclonic storms such as nor'easter s and polar lows by the heat mechanism that fuels them, which makes them "warm core" storm systems.
Tropical cyclones form in the oceans if the conditions in the area are favorable, and depending on their strength and location, there are various terms by which they are called, such as tropical depressiontropical stormhurricane and typhoon.
  • Hailstorm — a type of storm that precipitates round chunks of ice. Hailstorms usually occur during regular thunder storms. While most of the hail that precipitates from the clouds is fairly small and virtually harmless, there are occasional occurrences of hail greater than 2 inches (5 cm) in diameter that can cause much damage and injuries.
 
  • Tornado — A tornado is a violent, destructive wind storm occurring on land. Usually its appearance is that of a dark, funnel-shaped cloud. Often tornadoes are preceded by thunderstorms and a wall cloud. They are often called the most destructive of storms, and while they form all over the world, the interior of the United States is the most prone area, especially throughout Tornado Alley.

State police encourage severe storm readiness this spring

4/5/2018 (Permalink)

This is a very familiar sight here in Midland. So advanced preparation can limit your damages

Michigan State Police is encouraging residents to be ready for severe weather, with a nod to last summer’s flooding as a big reason for preparation.

Gov. Rick Snyder has proclaimed April 8 to 14 as Severe Weather Awareness Week.

“Severe Weather Awareness Week is the time of year to learn what to do before, during and after severe weather occurs,” Capt. Chris A. Kelenske, deputy state director of Emergency Management and Homeland Security and commander of the state police Emergency Management and Homeland Security Division, stated in a media release. “In Michigan, severe weather can include flooding, thunderstorms and tornadoes. By taking the initiative to learn about possible hazards and what to do until help arrives, you and your family will be better prepared when an emergency or disaster happens.”

 

Spring and summer frequently bring fast-changing weather conditions that increase the potential for severe weather. Steps to keep residents safe and minimize damage that can be taken before severe weather strikes include understanding severe weather warnings and terms, preparing an emergency supply kit, making an emergency plan and creating an emergency contact list.

Midland County was among those struck by flooding on June 23 after a series of thunderstorms poured torrential rains on the area.

All in all, the Tittabawassee River crested at 32.15 feet by 7:13 p.m. Saturday, June 24 — the second highest crest in history, according to National Weather Service records. It was surpassed only by the 33.89-foot crest during the flood of 1986.

 

The floodwaters left many residents across the city and county awestruck and recovering from damage including flooded homes, washed out roads and bridges, and destruction at landmarks like the Grace A. Dow Memorial Library. Bay, Gladwin and Isabella counties also suffered damage from the flooding.

The magnitude of the damage was severe enough to result in a federal disaster declaration and two disaster case managers were hired to work through the Great Lakes Bay Region Long Term Disaster Recovery Group in October to assist local residents dealing with long-term effects.

Severe weather awareness week is April 8th - April 14th

4/2/2018 (Permalink)

The weather in Michigan can change quickly. Being prepared could save your life

If weather causes a problem in your home give SERVPRO a call. We are here to help.

Tornadoes, lightning, floods, rip currents and early season heat - spring is three months of danger that can imperil the unprepared. It roars in like a lion, rampaging across the United States throughout March, April and May.  And there’s one hazard that can strike the coasts at any time: tsunamis.


Spring hazards include:


    • Severe Weather
    • Tornadoes
    • Floods
    • Lightning
    • Tsunamis
    • Rip Currents/Beach Hazards
    • Heat


Nobody knows the hazards of this dynamic season more than NOAA’s National Weather Service (NWS). We ask that you get weather-ready for spring with just a few simple steps:



    1. Know Your Risk


Check weather.gov every morning. It is a simple action that will ensure that you’re ready for the day’s weather. Don’t leave home without knowing the forecast.



    1. Take Action!


Assemble an emergency supplies kit with 72 hours worth of food and water. In an emergency (such as after a tornado or some other hazard event), you may be stuck at home without electricity for three days or more. Make sure that you’re prepared. Also, ensure that everyone in your life knows how to stay in touch with an emergency communication plan. This plan lists meeting places and alternate ways of communicating in case of emergency.



    1. Be A Force of Nature


Inspire others by sharing your weather-ready story on social media with the hashtag #SpringSafety. It can be a simple as posting a photo of your emergency supplies kit or letting your friends know how to reach you during an emergency. Together, we can build a Weather-Ready Nation, one that is ready for any extreme weather, water, or climate event.



For more information head over to the  National Weather Service Website

Being prepared can save your life!

1/2/2018 (Permalink)

A snow storm can hit fast and become very dangerous if your not prepared for it.

Here are some tips from the ready.gov website on what to do before extreme cold weather and snow hit

  • Make a Family Communications Plan. Your family may not be together when disaster strikes, so it is important to know how you will contact one another, how you will get back together and what you will do in case of an emergency.
  • Make an emergency kit for at least three days of self-sufficiency.
  • Keep space heater safety in mind: Use electric space heaters with automatic shut-off switches and non-glowing elements. Remember to keep all heat sources at least three feet away from furniture and drapes.
  • Prepare your home:
    • Make sure your home is well insulated and that you have weather stripping around your doors and window sills to keep the warm air inside.
    • Make sure you have a working carbon monoxide detector.
    • Keep fire extinguishers on hand, and make sure everyone in your house knows how to use them. House fires pose an additional risk, as more people turn to alternate heating sources without taking the necessary safety precautions.
    • Learn how to shut off water valves (in case a pipe bursts).
    • Insulate your home by installing storm windows or covering windows with plastic from the inside to keep cold air out.
  • Hire a contractor to check the structural ability of the roof to sustain unusually heavy weight from the accumulation of snow - or water, if drains on flat roofs do not work.
    • If you have a wood burning fireplace, consider storing wood to keep you warm if winter weather knocks out your heat. Also, make sure you have your chimney cleaned and inspected every year.
    • Have at least one of the following heat sources in case the power goes out:
      • Extra blankets, sleeping bags and warm winter coats
      • Fireplace or wood-burning stove with plenty of dry firewood, or a gas log fireplace
  • Prepare your vehicle:
    • Fully winterize your vehicle: Have a mechanic check antifreeze, brakes, heater and defroster, tires, and windshield wipers to ensure they are in good shape. Keep your gas tank at least half full.
    • Keep an extra emergency kit specifically created for your car. In addition to the basic essentials, consider adding a portable cell phone charger, ice scraper, extra blanket, sand for traction and jumper cables.
    • Rock salt or more environmentally safe products to melt ice on walkways. Visit the Environmental Protection Agency for a complete list of recommended products.
    • Sand to improve traction.
  • Make sure you have a cell phone with an emergency charging option (car, solar, hand crank, etc.) in case of a power failure.
  • People who depend on electricity to operate medical equipment should have alternate arrangements in place in case power is out for an extended period of time.
  • Plan to check on elderly/disabled relatives and neighbors.
  • Plan to bring pets inside.
  • Know where the manual release lever of your electric garage door opener is located and how to operate it in case you lose power.
  • Fill a gallon container with water and place them in the freezer to help keep food cold.
  • A NOAA Weather Radio broadcasts alerts and warnings directly from the National Weather Service for all hazards. You may also sign up in advance to receive notifications from your local emergency services.

SERVPRO Storm team acted quickly during the June Flooding

11/13/2017 (Permalink)

When Flooding hits SERVPRO Storm Team is ready!

During the recent rainstorms and flooding in Midland and Gladwin Counties SERVPRO activated the Storm team.  There were franchises in town from as far away as California and Texas.  Our Franchise took calls and dispatched them to our corporate offices who then in turn sent them out to franchises working in the area.  This way people got service within days of the flooding instead of weeks after.  

We can access the resources and personnel of 1,700 Franchises to handle major storms and disasters. We also have access to special Disaster Recovery Teams strategically located throughout the country to respond to catastrophic storms and events.  This makes us so much more capable than a small local restoration company.  We can have additional equipment and resources available very quickly.  

The Dangers of Snow.

11/13/2017 (Permalink)

Be safe out there this winter.

With winter quickly approaching SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin Counties would like to remind everyone of some of the dangers of snow.  

  • Accumulating snow can make driving motor vehicles very hazardous.
  • Visibility is reduced by falling snow and this is further exacerbated by strong winds creating whiteout conditions.
  • Heavy snowfall can immobilize a vehicle entirely, which may be deadly depending on how long it takes rescue crews to arrive. The clogging of a vehicle's tailpipe by snow may lead to carbon monoxide buildup inside the cabin
  • Snow buildup can weigh down a roof and cause trusses to cave in.
  • Snow piling up outside the house can block dryer vents or even some furnace exhaust vents causing dangerous fumes to enter your home.
  • Ice dams forming along the roof can create a backup of water to be forced up under your shingles.

So be safe out there this winter and if any of these thing happen to your home call us at (989)835-5015 and we will send a crew right over.

When Flooding or storms hit Midland SERVPRO is here to help!

4/26/2017 (Permalink)

If you have a flooded home we are ready to answer the call.

About Us

SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin Counties specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition. 

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost. we are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit Midland ,MI  we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1700 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today(989)835-5015

Severe weather awareness week is April 16th - April 22nd

4/11/2017 (Permalink)

If weather causes a problem in your home give SERVPRO a call. We are here to help.

Tornadoes, lightning, floods, rip currents and early season heat - spring is three months of danger that can imperil the unprepared. It roars in like a lion, rampaging across the United States throughout March, April and May.  And there’s one hazard that can strike the coasts at any time: tsunamis.


Spring hazards include:



  • Severe Weather/Tornadoes

  • Floods

  • Lightning

  • Tsunamis

  • Rip Currents/Beach Hazards

  • Heat


Nobody knows the hazards of this dynamic season more than NOAA’s National Weather Service (NWS). We ask that you get weather-ready for spring with just a few simple steps:



  1. Know Your Risk


Check weather.gov every morning. It is a simple action that will ensure that you’re ready for the day’s weather. Don’t leave home without knowing the forecast.



  1. Take Action!


Assemble an emergency supplies kit with 72 hours worth of food and water. In an emergency (such as after a tornado or some other hazard event), you may be stuck at home without electricity for three days or more. Make sure that you’re prepared. Also, ensure that everyone in your life knows how to stay in touch with an emergency communication plan. This plan lists meeting places and alternate ways of communicating in case of emergency.



  1. Be A Force of Nature


Inspire others by sharing your weather-ready story on social media with the hashtag #SpringSafety. It can be a simple as posting a photo of your emergency supplies kit or letting your friends know how to reach you during an emergency. Together, we can build a Weather-Ready Nation, one that is ready for any extreme weather, water, or climate event.


 


For more information head over to the  National Weather Service Website

When Storms or Floods hit Midland County, SERVPRO is ready!

4/11/2017 (Permalink)

We are Here to Help

About Us

SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin Counties specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition. 

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost. we are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit Midland ,MI  we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1700 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today(989)835-5015

Here are some winter storm tips.

11/4/2016 (Permalink)

Indoor safety

  • If possible stay indoors and dress warmly.
  • Clothes off unused rooms.
  • Seal drafts from doors and windows.
  • Avoid unnecessary opening up doors and windows.
  • Leave all water taps slightly open so they drip continuously.
  • Listen to your radio, television or NOAA Weather Radio for weather reports an emergency information


    If there is a power failure
  • Used battery powered flashlights or lanterns rather than candles, if possible.
  • Never leave lit candles unattended.
  • Never use charcoal or gas grills in doors the fumes are deadly.
  • Never use a generator in a garage basement or other enclosed area.

    Outdoor safety
  • Find shelter.
  • Cover all exposed body parts.
  • Build shelter a lean-to, windbreak or snow cave for protection from the wind.
  • Build a fire for heat and to attract attention.
  • Place rocks around the fire to absorb and reflect Heat.
  • Melt snow for drinking water eating snow will lower your body temperature.
  • Avoid overexertion.
  • Cover your mouth to protect your lungs from extremely cold air.
  • Avoid working too hard( strains your heart
  • Drink water and other fluids to avoid dehydration.
  • Watch for signs of frostbite and hypothermia.
  • Drink warm liquids that do not contain caffeine or alcohol.
  • Avoid walking on ice.


          It is a good idea to keep emergency items in your car like non-perishable, food, water, warm blankets extra clothes, gloves, hats and scarves during the cold winter months.

    If you are trapped in your car in a winter storm
  • Stay in the car.
  • Do not leave the car to look for help and less help is visible within 100 yards.
  • Display a call for help sign.
  • Raise the car hood or hang a brightly colored cloth on the antenna to signal for help.
  • To keep warm turn on the car's engine for about 10 minutes each hour.
  • Run the heater and turn on the car lights only when the car is running or while running the car battery down.
  • Keep the exhaust pipe clear of snow to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning.
  • Slightly open a window away from the blowing wind for fresh air.
  • Leave the overhead light on when the engine is running so that you can be seen.
  • As you said, Keep moving your arms and legs to keep blood circulating in to stay warm.
  • If you are alone, stay awake as much as possible.
  • If more than one person is in the car, take turns sleeping.
  • For warmth, huddle close together.
  • Wrap your body and head with extra clothes blankets newspapers Maps or removal car mats.

Safety instructions during a tornado

11/4/2016 (Permalink)

A tornado can be deadly so use these tips to keep you safe

 

The Midland / Gladwin area is a high risk tornado area but it can happen.  Here are a few tips from SERVPRO to help identify the signs of a weather event and keep you safe. 

 

 

  • Environmental signs
    Dark often greenish sky
  • Large hail
  • Large, dark, low-lying cloud (particularly if rotating)
  • Loud roar, similar to a freight train or jet engine
  • An unusual quiet occurring shortly after a thunderstorm
  • Clouds moving quickly in a rotating pattern that converges towards one area
  • Debris falling from the sky
  • Objects such as branches or leaves a being pulled upwards


    What to do in a tornado
    A structure (e.g. residence, small building, School, Nursing Home, Hospital facility, Shopping Center, high-rise building)
  • Go to a pre-designated shelter such as a safe room, basement, storm cellar, or lowest building level.
  • If there is no basement go to the center of an interior room on the lowest level (closet, interior hallway) away from corners, windows, doors and outside walls.
  • Put as many walls as possible between you and the outside.
  • Get under a sturdy table and use your arms to protect your head and neck.
  • Do not open windows.
  • Interior stairwells are usually good places to take shelter, and if not crowded, allow you to get to a lower level quickly.
  • Stay off the elevators you could be trapped in them if power is lost



    Outside with no shelter or a no vehicle trailer or mobile structure
  • Get out immediately and go to the lowest floor of a sturdy nearby building or storm shelter mobile structures even if tied down offer little protection from tornadoes.
  • Lie flat in a nearby ditch or depression and cover your head with your hands.
  • Be aware of the potential for flooding.
  • Do not get under an overpass or Bridge you are safer in a low flat location.
  • Never try to outrun a tornado in urban or congested areas in a car or truck. Instead leave the vehicle immediately for safe shelter.
  • Watch out for flying debris flying debris from tornadoes causes most fatalities and injuries.

Heavy snow can weaken your roof and cause serious damage

10/27/2016 (Permalink)

Too much snow can break your trusses.

While snow-covered roofs can make for a picturesque winter scene, the combination of freshly fallen snow with the melting and refreezing of snow can place stress on the roof of your home or business. If more than a foot of heavy, wet snow and ice have accumulated on the roof, you should have it removed.

Snow Removal Tips

Clearing the snow off your roof from the gutters or eaves upwards of three to four feet after each winter storm can help prevent ice dams from forming. Remember to avoid using a ladder in snowy and icy conditions. This can be extremely dangerous and is best left to professionals.

For Flat Roofs:

If your flat roof is easily accessible from an interior stairway, you may want to shovel the roof, but be careful not to damage the roof covering.

Remember to put safety first any time you are on a roof, especially one that is covered in snow and ice. If you have any doubt, leave it to professionals.

For Sloped Roofs:

It may be possible to remove the snow and ice from your sloped roof using a roof rake – a long-handled tool designed specifically for this purpose. Stand on the ground and pull as much of the snow off the eaves as you can safely reach.

If you cannot safely reach the roof, contact a home builder, landscaping and roofing contractor, or property maintenance company to remove the snow and ice. Before hiring a contractor, check their references. Always be sure any contractor you hire is qualified, insured and bonded.

The amount of snow and ice your roof can support will depend on a number of factors, including the roof type as well as the age and condition of the structure. But a good rule to keep in mind is if more than a foot of heavy, wet snow and ice has accumulated on your roof, you should have it removed.

Tips for driving in a rainstorm

10/27/2016 (Permalink)

Be careful when the roads become wet and slippery

Nearly half (47%) of all weather-related car accidents — more than 700,000 a year — are due to rain.

As fall’s soggy weather fast approaches, it’s crucial that you know how to safely maneuver your vehicle and avoid weather-related accidents.
Here are 10 tips for driving in the rain:

Step 1. Exercise caution. Engine oil and grease build-up on roads and highways over time, and when combined with precipitation, you’ve got the equivalent of an automotive Slip ‘N Slide.

Step 2. Slow down. Wet pavement causes tires to lose traction and vehicles become more difficult to handle.

Step 3. Use headlights. Always use headlights in the rain – even if it’s just a sprinkle. Headlights help you see and be seen in wet weather.

Step 4. Keep your windshield wipers in tip-top shape. Summer can wreak havoc on your blades, so get them checked before fall’s showers arrive.

Step 5. Defog your windows. Precipitation can cause your windshield to quickly fog up, so use the front and rear defrosters to maximize visibility.

Step 6. Avoid pooling water. By splashing through puddles you can impair your vision and other drivers’. Additionally, standing water often shields potholes and debris from view and it can reduce the effectiveness of your vehicle’s brakes.

Step 7. If your car begins to hydroplane, do not brake or turn the wheel abruptly as this may cause your vehicle to go into a skid or spin. Take your foot off the gas and keep the wheel straight until your car reclaims traction.

Step 8. Increase your following distance. Slick roads, wet brakes and reduced visibility can lead to collisions. Give other vehicles plenty of room and brake early with reduced force.

Step 9. Don’t use cruise control. It can cause your car to accelerate when hydroplaning and reduces driver attentiveness.

Step 10. Drive in the tracks of the car in front of you. This allows the vehicle ahead to displace any standing water that’s on the road.

By employing these safe driving techniques you can keep yourself and your passengers safe during fall and winter drizzles and downpours. Rainy roads can be dangerous, but if we all slow down and use extra caution, rainy days might actually be a little brighter.

Weather warnings on the go from the national weather service!

9/19/2016 (Permalink)

Be ready for whatever happens!

September is national preparedness month and here at SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin Counties we want you to be ready for something to happen rather than get caught off guard. Here is some information on wireless weather warnings. 

Wireless Emergency Alerts - English
With a unique sound and vibration, Wireless Emergency Alerts keep you in the know, wherever you are.

Wireless Emergency Alerts - Español
Con una alerta de sonido y vibración Alertas Inalámbricas de Emergencia te mantienen al tanto donde estés.

Imagine this: You’re driving down the highway, humming along to your favorite tunes, when the cell phone stowed in your bag suddenly makes a strange noise. To investigate, you take the next exit and safely pull over to check the screen. Good thing you did: Your phone just alerted you to a tornado a few miles away in same county you’re driving through.

Sound plausible? It is. America’s wireless industry is helping to build a Weather-Ready Nation through a nationwide text emergency alert system, called Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA), which will warn you when weather threatens. Read the rest of the article on NOAA.gov.

And check out real stories of how WEA has saved lives across America.



Frequently Asked Questions 

1. What are WEA messages?

Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) are emergency messages sent by authorized government alerting authorities through your mobile carrier. Government partners include local and state public safety agencies, FEMA, the FCC, the Department of Homeland Security, and the National Weather Service.

No signup is required! Alerts are sent automatically to WEA-capable phones during an emergency.

2. Why is this important to me?
Alerts received at the right time can help keep you safe during an emergency. With WEA, alerts can be sent to your mobile device when you may be in harm's way, without need to download an app or subscribe to a service.

3. What types of alerts will I receive?

  •    Extreme weather warnings
  •    Local emergencies requiring evacuation or immediate action
  •    AMBER Alerts
  •    Presidential Alerts during a national emergency

  • Example of a Wireless Emergency Alert on an iPhone 5 (AT&T).

    4. What does a WEA message look like?
    WEA will look like a text message. The WEA message will typically show the type and time of the alert, any action you should take, and the agency issuing the alert. The message will be no more than 90 characters.



    5. How will I know the difference between WEA and a regular text message?

    WEA messages include a special tone and vibration, both repeated twice.

    6. What types of WEA messages will the National Weather Service send?

  •    Tsunami Warnings (see Fact Sheet)
  •    Tornado and Flash Flood Warnings
  •    Hurricane, Typhoon, Dust Storm and Extreme Wind Warnings
  • 7. What should I do when I receive a WEA message?
    Follow any action advised by the emergency message. Seek more details from your favorite TV or radio station, NOAA Weather Radio, news website, desktop application, mobile application, or other trusted source of information.

    8. Will I receive a WEA message if I'm visiting an area where I don't live, or outside the area where my phone is registered?
    Yes, if you have a WEA-capable phone and your wireless carrier participates in the program. For information about which mobile devices are WEA-capable and carrier participation, please visit http://www.ctia.org/wea or contact your wireless carrier.

    9. What if I travel into a threat area after a WEA message is already sent?
    If you travel into a threat area after an alert is first sent, your WEA-capable device will receive the message when you enter the area.

    10. When will I start receiving WEA messages from the NWS?
    The NWS began participation in the WEA service in late June 2012.  Some mobile devices, especially older ones, are not WEA-capable. When you buy a new mobile device, it probably will be able to receive WEA messages. For more details on WEA, including links to your wireless service providers’ unique WEA service information, please visit: www.ctia.org/wea.

    11. Is this the same service public safety agencies have asked the public to register for?
    No, but they are complementary. Local agencies may have asked you to sign up to receive telephone calls, text messages, or emails. Those messages often include specific details about a critical event. WEA are very short messages designed to get your attention in an emergency situation. They may not give all the details you receive from other notification services.

    12. Will I be charged for receiving WEA messages?
    No. This service is offered for free by wireless carriers. WEA messages will not count towards texting limits on your wireless plan.

    13. Does WEA know where I am? Is it tracking me?
    No. WEA use radio technology to broadcast the alert from cell towers to mobile devices in the area of the threat. Therefore, WEA doesn’t don't know exactly who is tuned in.

    14. Will a WEA message interrupt my phone conversations?
    No, the alert will be delayed until you finish your call.

    15. How often will I receive WEA messages?
    You may receive frequent WEA messages during an emergency. Message frequency depends on the number of imminent threats to life or property in your area.

    16. If, during an emergency, I can't make or receive calls or text messages due to network congestion, will I still be able to receive a WEA message?
    Yes, WEA messages are not affected by network congestion.

    17. What if I don't want to receive WEA messages?

    You can opt-out of receiving WEA messages for imminent threats and AMBER alerts, but not for Presidential messages. To opt out, please refer to instructions from your wireless carrier or visithttp://www.ctia.org/wea for more information.

    Some cell phones allow the users to opt-in and opt-out directly on their devices. These devices differentiate the imminent threat alerts into two categories - "Extreme alerts" and "Severe alerts" as shown in the image below. 

    The Extreme alerts from the National Weather Service include warnings for tsunamis, tornadoes, extreme winds, hurricanes and typhoons. The Severe alerts from National Weather Service include warnings for flash floods and dust storms. For example, by keeping Extreme alert selected and de-selecting Severe alert, the user would still be capable of receiving Extreme alerts, but would not receive Severe alerts on their cell phone.   


    18. Why did I receive an alert when there was no warning in effect for my location?
    WEA messages are broadcast using radio-like technology from cell towers in, and sometimes around, the actual warning area. Therefore, an alert can reach cell phones outside of the actual warning area depending on the broadcast range of the cell towers which broadcast the alert. This overreach is typically more prevalent in rural areas than in more densely populated cities.

    19. How will I receive alerts if I don't have a WEA-capable device?
    WEA is one of many ways you can receive emergency notifications. Other sources include NOAA Weather Radio, news media coverage, the Emergency Alert System on radio and TV broadcasts, desktop applications, mobile applications, and other alerting methods offered by local and state public safety agencies. Your best use of WEA is to immediately seek additional information about the imminent threat impacting your area.

    20. How do I let my friends and family know how Wireless Emergency Alerts work?
    FEMA has produced Public Service Announcements that demonstrate how wireless alerts save lives. These short videos are available in English and Spanish and can be downloaded and shared with others.

    21. How does the NWS activate a Wireless Emergency Alert on my cell phone? The NWS pushes our suite of warnings, advisories, and watches to a national collection pointcalled the Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) The NWS specially marks our most critical NWS alerts for WEA distribution, so that when they reach IPAWS, they are pushed to commercial wireless carriers who broadcast the alert from cell towers in the threat area to your cell phone. IPAWS also serves as collection point for non-weather alerts, such as civil and child abduction emergency messages which are issued by other emergency authorities. Once an alert is in IPAWS, the alert may be made available through a variety of channels for further distribution, such as broadcast over television/radio stations, sirens, display on highway signs, desktop and mobile alert software application, and the Wireless Emergency Alert system.

    WEA Factsheet (PDF) - Download a factsheet on Wireless Emergency Alerts.

    Severe weather awareness week.

    4/14/2016 (Permalink)

    Lightning strikes can cause serious damage to your family home or business. Call SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin counties and we can help.

    SAGINAW, MI (WNEM) -

    We continue our coverage of Severe Weather Awareness Week from April 10th through April 16th. Each night, during our 5:30 and 11 PM newscasts, we will bring you a different safety tip to keep you and your family safe this spring, summer, and fall.

    Dort Federal Credit Union brings severe Weather Awareness Week at TV5 to you!

    Tonight's Tip: Lightning Safety

    When thunderstorms are in the area, we hear the thunder, but we don't always see lightning, which sometimes causes us to continue on with our activities. But it's important to know that if you're close enough to hear thunder, you're also close enough to be struck by lightning.

    According to the National Weather Service, lightning kills an average of 49 people per year, and hundreds more are severely injured. This is often attributed to delayed action or no action at all to head indoors.

    The best practice for lightning safety is "when the thunder roars, head indoors".

    Additional Lightning Tips (Courtesy: NOAA/National Weather Service)

    Indoors

  • Stay off corded telephones. Cellular and cordless devices are safe.
  • Avoid touching electronic objects such as televisions, computers, or cords. Remote controls are safe.
  • Avoid plumbing (showers, sinks, etc.)
  • Stay away from windows and doors.
  • Do not lie on or lean against concrete walls.
  • Outdoors

  • Avoid open fields, hills, and ridge tops.
  • Avoid standing next to tall objects.
  • Avoid water and other wet items, and stay away from metal objects such as poles and fencing.
  • For additional information, head to the National Weather Service's Lightning Safety Page.


    Read more: http://www.wnem.com/story/31694808/severe-weather-awareness-week-lightning-safety#ixzz45p7TRIra