Recent Fire Damage Posts

AFTER a fire

10/10/2019 (Permalink)

Once the fire is out and the fire department has determined it is safe for you to reenter there are a few things you should do.  Following these tips can help you get through the process of getting your home repaired and contents cleaned.

  • Contact your insurance agent and get a claim started immediately.  Even the smallest fire can cause smoke and soot damage to an entire house
  • Limit movement in the house until the damage can be surveyed by a professional.  sitting on furniture or walking on carpet with soot on it can cause repairable damage.
  • Do not eat or drink anything from the house.  Even if items may have been in an area away from the fire they may have contamination on them or in them and it is not worth getting sick.  
  • Do not remove items from the house.  Even if it appears to be clean it is best to have a professional inspect it.

If you do have a fire of any kind SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin Counties is here to help. We can come out and inspect the damages and make it "Like it never even happened." Call us today @ (989)835-5015.

Smoke and Soot

8/23/2019 (Permalink)

Smoke and soot is very invasive and can penetrate various cavities within your home, causing hidden damage and odor. Our smoke damage expertise and experience allows us to inspect and accurately assess the extent of the damage to develop a comprehensive plan of action.  

Smoke and soot facts:

  • Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
  • Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.
  • The type of smoke may greatly affect the restoration process.

Different Types of Smoke

There are two different types of smoke–wet and dry. As a result, there are different types of soot residue after a fire. Before restoration begins, SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin counties will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

Wet Smoke – Plastic and Rubber

  • Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, sticky, smeary. Smoke webs are more difficult to clean.

Dry Smoke – Paper and Wood

  • Fast burning, high temperatures, heat rises therefore smoke rises.

Protein Fire Residue – Produced by evaporation of material rather than from a fire

  • Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, extreme pungent odor. 

Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions.  We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your fire and smoke damage.  We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Call Us Today – (989) 835-5015

Preventing a kitchen fire

7/15/2019 (Permalink)

More home fires start in the kitchen than anywhere else. In 2011, cooking was involved in an estimated 156,300 home fires that caused:

  • 470 deaths
  • 5,390 injuries
  • $1 billion in property damage

These Numbers could be greatly reduced if people paid more attention when they cooked and practiced simple fire safety behaviors.

Unattended Cooking

is the leading cause of kitchen fires

  • Stay in the kitchen when frying, grilling of broiling food
  • Check food regularly – use a timer to remind you the stove/oven is On
  • If you must leave – turn the oven Off

Stay Alert

to avoid stirring up trouble

  • Don’t use the oven or stovetop if you are sleepy, have consumed alcohol or are using drugs.

Hot Tips

  • Keep pot handles turned in
  • When you microwave food, open the container slowly to let steam escape and let food cool before eating
  • Cool a burn under water for 3 to 5 minutes and cover it with a clean dry cloth
  • If the burn is bigger than your fist, seek immediate medical assistance

Flammable Objects

Keep away from the stove

  • Keep anything that can burn a safe distance away from the stove
  • Clean up food and grease from burners and the stovetop
  • Wear short, tight-fighting, or lightly-rolled sleeves. If clothes catch fire, stop, drop and roll over and over or back and forth to put the fire out. Get medical help.

Be Ready

to react fast to a cooking fire

  • When in doubt – just get out!
  • If you try to fight fire with a fire extinguisher, be sure:
    1. Other people are leaving the home
    2. Someone is calling the fire department
    3. You have a clear exit path
  • If a small fire starts:
    1. Slide a lid over the pan
    2. Turn Off the burner
    3. Leave a the pan covered until it is completely cool
  • For an oven or microwave fire, turn off the unit and keep the door closed.  

If you do have a problem in the kitchen or any other room in the house give SERVPRO of Midland/Gladwin counties a call.  We will clean up all Fire, Smoke and water damage. 

If your midland home has a fire

4/5/2019 (Permalink)

Fire, smoke and soot can cause long-term damage if not properly handled.  As smoke travels through a structure, soot settles out of the air, depositing on surfaces and contents, in H VAC systems and duct work and virtually anywhere else air can travel.  Soot can be corrosive, quickly deteriorating metal fixtures and electronics, and must be handled promptly and properly to help limit secondary damages.  Delayed or improper cleaning allows particles to interact with contents and structural components.  This interaction can cause additional damage to flooring, paint and contents produced by prolonged exposure and improper cleaning.  The first twenty-four hours following a fire are critical and can make the difference between restoring versus replacing contents and belongings.  

SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin counties franchise professionals realize the importance of fast, appropriate action which can limit the damage to valuable assets and belongings.  SERVPRO's 1-4-8 Service Response Guidelines promote timely response and can help prevent fire damage from escalating into long term problems.  By providing timely response, SERVPRO Franchise professionals help restore property and belongings to preloss condition.  

When a fire occurs in your home you can trust us to be there quickly, reducing downtime, lowering costs and minimizing stress.  

Learning about Smoke and Soot

3/28/2019 (Permalink)

Smoke and soot facts:

  • Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
  • Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.
  • The type of smoke may greatly affect the restoration process.

Different Types of Smoke

There are two different types of smoke–wet and dry. As a result, there are different types of soot residue after a fire. Before restoration begins, SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin counties will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

Wet Smoke – Plastic and Rubber

  • Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, sticky, smeary. Smoke webs are more difficult to clean.

Dry Smoke – Paper and Wood

  • Fast burning, high temperatures, heat rises therefore smoke rises.

Protein Fire Residue – Produced by evaporation of material rather than from a fire

  • Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, extreme pungent odor. 

Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions.  We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your fire and smoke damage.  We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Call Us Today – (989) 835-5015

October 7 to October 13th is Fire prevention week

9/25/2018 (Permalink)

We have certified cleaning technicians to handle your cleanup.

Did you know that if a fire starts in your home you may have as little as two minutes to escape? During a fire, early warning from a working smoke alarm plus a fire escape plan that has been practiced regularly can save lives. Learn what else to do to keep your loved ones safe!

Top Tips for Fire Safety

  1. Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, inside bedrooms and outside sleeping areas.

  2. Test smoke alarms every month. If they’re not working, change the batteries.

  3. Talk with all family members about a fire escape plan and practice the plan twice a year.

  4. If a fire occurs in your home, GET OUT, STAY OUT and CALL FOR HELP. Never go back inside for anything or anyone.

It is also recommended to replace smoke alarms every five years.  Find more info here http://www.redcross.org/mo2g

We have certified fire cleaning technicians.

9/24/2018 (Permalink)

Smoke and soot can damage items beyond repair.

If you have a fire SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin Counties is up to the task. Making your home livable again is a big job even after the smallest fire. Every single thing in the house has to be inspected before it should be used.

Clothing and linen items should be professionally laundered to remove the soot or as one of our customers referred to it "that camp fire smell"

Soot can damage circuit boards so any electronics should be sent out and cleaned.

Any food items that are in a house fire should not be eaten.

All carpet and upholstery should be cleaned if possible. Sometimes the damage is beyond cleaning and needs to be replaced.

Our highly trained technicians could make that assessment during the initial walk through.

Knowing what type fire extinguisher to use could save your property

8/10/2018 (Permalink)

If a fire is small and you can get it under control you can minimize the damage.

There are 5 main fire extinguisher types – Water, Foam, Dry Powder, CO2 and Wet Chemical. You should have the right types of fire extinguisher for your premises, or you may not meet current regulations.

The various types of fire extinguisher put out fires started with different types of fuel – these are called ‘classes’ of fire.  The fire risk from the different classes of fire in your business premises will determine which fire extinguisher types you need.

Whilst there are 5 main types of fire extinguisher, there are different versions of both the Water and Dry Powder extinguishers, meaning there are a total of 8 fire extinguisher types to choose from.  The 8 types of fire extinguisher are:

– Water
– Water Mist
– Water Spray
– Foam
– Dry Powder – Standard
– Dry Powder – Specialist
– Carbon Dioxide (‘CO2’)
– Wet Chemical

There is no one extinguisher type which works on all classes of fire.

Below is a summary of the classes of fire, and a quick reference chart showing which types of extinguisher should be used on each.  We then provide a detailed explanation of each type of fire extinguisher below.

The classes of fire

There are six classes of fire: Class A, Class B, Class C, Class D, ‘Electrical’, and Class F.

 –    Class A fires – combustible materials: caused by flammable solids, such as wood, paper, and fabric
 –    Class B fires – flammable liquids: such as petrol, turpentine or paint
 –    Class C fires – flammable gases: like hydrogen, butane or methane
 –    Class D fires – combustible metals: chemicals such as magnesium, aluminum or potassium
 –    Electrical fires – electrical equipment: once the electrical item is removed, the fire changes class
 –    Class F fires – cooking oils: typically a chip-pan fire

Types of fire extinguisher – a detailed guide

Water Extinguishers

Overview:
Water extinguishers are the most common fire extinguisher type for class A fire risk. Most premises will require either water or foam extinguishers.

Label Colour:
– Bright Red

Use for:
– Organic materials such as:
o Paper and cardboard
o Fabrics and textiles
o Wood and coal

Do not use for:
– Fires involving electrical equipment
– Kitchen fires
– Flammable gas and liquids

How water extinguishers work:
The water has a cooling effect on the fuel, causing it to burn much more slowly until the flames are eventually extinguished.

Types of premises/business who may need water extinguishers:
– Buildings constructed of wood or other organic materials
– Premises where there are organic materials to be found such as:
o Offices
o Schools
o Hospitals
o Residential properties
o Warehouses

In fact most buildings need either water or foam extinguishers.

Where to locate water extinguishers:
– By the exits on a floor where a Class A fire risk has been identified

Water spray extinguishers – what’s the difference?:
Water spray extinguishers are equipped with a spray nozzle, rather than a jet nozzle, meaning a greater surface area can be covered more quickly and the fire put out more rapidly.

Water mist extinguishers – what’s the difference?:
Water mist extinguishers have a different type of nozzle again which releases microscopic water particles. These particles ‘suffocate’ the fire and also create a wall of mist between the fire and the person using the extinguisher, reducing the feeling of heat.

Foam Extinguishers

Overview:
Foam extinguishers are most common type of fire extinguisher for Class B fires, but also work on Class A fires as they are water-based.

Label Colour:
– Cream

Use for:
– Organic materials such as:
o Paper and cardboard
o Fabrics and textiles
o Wood and coal
Plus:
– Flammable liquids, like paint and petrol

Do not use for:
– Kitchen fires
– Fires involving electrical equipment
– Flammable metals

How foam extinguishers work:
As with water extinguishers, foam extinguishers have a cooling effect on the fuel. On burning liquids, the foaming agent creates a barrier between the flame and the fuel, extinguishing the fire.

Types of premises/business who may need Foam extinguishers:
– Buildings constructed of wood or other organic materials
– Premises where there are organic materials to be found such as:
o Offices
o Schools
o Hospitals
o Residential properties
o Warehouses
– Buildings where flammable liquids are stored

In fact most buildings need either water or foam extinguishers

Where to locate foam extinguishers:
– By the exits on a floor where a Class A or Class B fire risk has been identified

Dry Powder Extinguishers

Overview:
Standard dry powder extinguishers are also called ‘ABC’ extinguishers because they tackle class A, B and C fires, however they are not recommended for use in enclosed spaces. This is because the powder can be easily inhaled, and also the residue is very difficult to clean up after. ABC powder extinguishers can also be used on some electrical fires. Specialist dry powder extinguishers are used for flammable metals.

Label Colour:
– Blue

Use for:
– Organic materials such as:
o Paper and cardboard
o Fabrics and textiles
o Wood and coal
Plus:
– Flammable liquids, like paint and petrol
Plus:
– Flammable gases, like liquid petroleum gas (LPG) and acetylene
Plus:
– Fires involving electrical equipment up to 1000v

Specialist dry powder extinguishers are only used on flammable metals, such as titanium and magnesium.

Do not use for:
– Fires involving cooking oil
– Fires involving electrical equipment over 1000v
– or in enclosed spaces, such as offices or residential properties

How dry powder extinguishers work:
Dry powder extinguishers smother fires by forming a barrier between the fuel and the source of oxygen.

Types of premises/business who may need Dry Powder extinguishers:
– Businesses using flammable gases for chemical processes
– Premises where welding and flame cutting takes place
– Garage forecourts
– Liquid petroleum gas (LPG) dispensing plants
– Premises with large, commercial boiler rooms

Where to locate Dry Powder extinguishers:
– Place dry powder extinguishers near to the source of the fire risk.

Specialist Dry Powder extinguishers – what’s the difference?:
Specialist dry powder extinguishers work in the same way as standard dry powder extinguishers but are for use with flammable metals only. There are 2 types of specialist dry powder extinguishers – ‘L2’ which only tackles lithium fires, and ‘M28’, for all other flammable metal fires.

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Extinguishers

Overview:
CO2 extinguishers are predominantly used for electrical fire risks and are usually the main fire extinguisher type provided in computer server rooms. They also put out Class B fires (flammable liquids, such as paint and petroleum).

Label Colour:
– Black

Use for:
– Flammable liquids, like paint and petrol
– Electrical fires

Do not use for:
– Kitchen fires – especially chip-pan fires
– Combustible materials like paper, wood or textiles
– Flammable metals

How CO2 extinguishers work:
CO2 extinguishers suffocate fires by displacing the oxygen the fire needs to burn.

Types of premises/business who may need CO2 extinguishers:
– Premises with electrical equipment, such as:
o Offices
o Kitchens
o Construction sites
o Server rooms

All work vehicles should also carry a smaller 2kg CO2 extinguisher.

Where to locate CO2 extinguishers:
– Place near to the source of the fire risk and/or near the fire exits.

Wet Chemical Extinguishers

Overview:
Wet chemical extinguishers are designed for use on Class F fires, involving cooking oils and fats.  They can also be used on Class A fires although it is more usual to have a foam or water extinguisher for this type of fire risk.

Label Colour:
– Yellow

Use for:
– Cooking oil/fat fires
– Organic materials such as:
o Paper and cardboard
o Fabrics and textiles
o Wood and coal

Do not use for:
– Flammable liquid or gas fires
– Electrical fires
– Flammable metals

How wet chemical extinguishers work:
Wet chemical extinguishers create a layer of foam on the surface of the burning oil or fat, preventing oxygen from fuelling the fire any further. The spray also has a cooling effect.

Types of premises/business who may need CO2 extinguishers:
– Commercial kitchens
– Canteens

Where to locate CO2 extinguishers:
– Place near to the source of the fire risk.

Remember safety first.  Always have a safe escape route planned and get out before its too late.

You had a house fire, now what?

7/13/2018 (Permalink)

We can help put your life back in order

In the event of a house fire SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin Counties should be near the top of your call list.  We have trained professional who know how to deal with everything that comes along with a fire.  We can handle everything from board up to getting you back home.  Even the smallest fire can produce soot and contaminants throughout your whole house and you should not have to deal with that alone. How we proceed depends on how much damage there is.  We will deal directly with you adjestor and guide you through the process of getting your life back together.  We understand that this is probably the worst thing you have ever had happen and we have been through this many times before.  

So if you need our help call us at (989)835-5015

A puff-back can deposit soot all over you home.

4/16/2018 (Permalink)

Soot webs are usually left behind in a fire or puff-back

What is a puff back you ask?  It is a misfiring in the furnace that, at its worst, can send soot throughout your home, covering drapes, bedding, furniture, cabinets, walls, and everything in between. It requires expensive cleaning and restoration in addition to repairs on your heating system. It is basically like having a small fire in your home.  

So what should you do if this happens to you? First limit movement in the house to avoid spreading the soot.  Then call SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin counties at (989)835-5015.  We will come in and clean every square inch of your home using industry standard as our guideline.  Depending on how bad the contamination is some areas may need to be repainted after the soot is removed.   

3 tips to make sure your rental home is safe from carbon monoxide and fire

4/3/2018 (Permalink)

Remember safety first when traveling
The death of a family of four from Iowa at a property in Mexico has illustrated the potentially lethal hazards when renting a home or condominium for vacation.

Authorities say Kevin and Amy Sharp and their two children were found dead on March 23 after they inhaled a toxic gas in their vacation rental in Tulum.

 So how do you know if a vacation rental property is safe for your family?

TODAY national investigative correspondent Jeff Rossen spoke with an expert who provided three things you should do the moment you first arrive at your vacation rental in order to protect your family

Experts believe the toxic gas that killed the Sharp family was most likely carbon monoxide, which is tasteless, odorless and invisible.

Dave Hamilton with the Morris County Public Safety Training Academy in New Jersey noted to Rossen how it's not possible to tell that a hot water heater is leaking gas even by standing right next to it. So there is a crucial item to bring on vacation - a carbon monoxide detector.

Hamilton suggests mounting a battery-operated or plug-in carbon monoxide detector, which can be purchased for under $30, right outside the room that contains the furnace and water heater. Those are usually the common generation points for carbon monoxide.

In many popular vacation destinations in foreign countries, carbon monoxide detectors are not necessarily required by law.

 "One of the best things you can do is take one, and put it in your suitcase,'' Hamilton told Rossen. "Travel with it. They're going to protect you."

Another potential danger in vacation rentals is fire, as you would have no idea if the home you rented is up to code.

Hamilton suggests immediately learning where the fire extinguisher in the rental is located and double-checking so that you know how to get to it quickly in case of an emergency.

Hamilton's third tip is making sure you know where all the exits to the home are located so that you have a fire escape plan.

"Not just the front door, you need to know where the secondary exits are,'' he said. "For example, there's a doorway hidden behind this curtain and there's also another doorway half way down the stairs that you would not be able to find in thick black smoke."

Three simple steps - bringing carbon monoxide detector, locating the fire extinguisher and knowing all the exits - can make sure your family can fully relax on vacation.

Fire prevention week is October 8th to the 14th.

9/25/2017 (Permalink)

If you do have a fire call SERVPRO of Midland /Gladwin Counties for all your Cleanup and Restoration needs.

Did you know that if a fire starts in your home you may have as little as two minutes to escape? During a fire, early warning from a working smoke alarm plus a fire escape plan that has been practiced regularly can save lives. Learn what else to do to keep your loved ones safe!

Top Tips for Fire Safety

  1. Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, inside bedrooms and outside sleeping areas.

  2. Test smoke alarms every month. If they’re not working, change the batteries.

  3. Talk with all family members about a fire escape plan and practice the plan twice a year.

  4. If a fire occurs in your home, GET OUT, STAY OUT and CALL FOR HELP. Never go back inside for anything or anyone.

It is also recommended to replace smoke alarms every five years.  Find more info here http://www.redcross.org/mo2g

Cleaning up after a fire is a dirty job....

9/19/2017 (Permalink)

Call SERVPRO no matter how small the fire is.

...But as the saying goes someone has to do it.  SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin Counties is up to the task.   Making your home livable again is a big job even after the smallest fire.  Every single thing in the house has to be inspected before it should be used.  

Clothing and linen items should be professionally laundered to remove the soot or as one of our customers referred to it "that camp fire smell"

Soot can damage circuit boards so any electronics should be sent out and cleaned.  

Any food items that are in a house fire should not be eaten.

All carpet and upholstery should be cleaned if possible. Sometimes the damage is beyond cleaning and needs to be replaced.  

Our highly trained technicians could make that assessment during the initial walk through.

Here are some tips about the different types of Fire extinguishers

8/21/2017 (Permalink)

Soot webs that appear after a fire

There are 5 main fire extinguisher types – Water, Foam, Dry Powder, CO2 and Wet Chemical. You should have the right types of fire extinguisher for your premises, or you may not meet current regulations.

The various types of fire extinguisher put out fires started with different types of fuel – these are called ‘classes’ of fire.  The fire risk from the different classes of fire in your business premises will determine which fire extinguisher types you need.

Whilst there are 5 main types of fire extinguisher, there are different versions of both the Water and Dry Powder extinguishers, meaning there are a total of 8 fire extinguisher types to choose from.  The 8 types of fire extinguisher are:

– Water
– Water Mist
– Water Spray
– Foam
– Dry Powder – Standard
– Dry Powder – Specialist
– Carbon Dioxide (‘CO2’)
– Wet Chemical

There is no one extinguisher type which works on all classes of fire.

Below is a summary of the classes of fire, and a quick reference chart showing which types of extinguisher should be used on each.  We then provide a detailed explanation of each type of fire extinguisher below.

The classes of fire

There are six classes of fire: Class A, Class B, Class C, Class D, ‘Electrical’, and Class F.

 –    Class A fires – combustible materials: caused by flammable solids, such as wood, paper, and fabric
 –    Class B fires – flammable liquids: such as petrol, turpentine or paint
 –    Class C fires – flammable gases: like hydrogen, butane or methane
 –    Class D fires – combustible metals: chemicals such as magnesium, aluminum or potassium
 –    Electrical fires – electrical equipment: once the electrical item is removed, the fire changes class
 –    Class F fires – cooking oils: typically a chip-pan fire

 

Types of fire extinguisher – a detailed guide

Water Extinguishers

Overview:
Water extinguishers are the most common fire extinguisher type for class A fire risk. Most premises will require either water or foam extinguishers.

Label Colour:
– Bright Red

Use for:
– Organic materials such as:
o Paper and cardboard
o Fabrics and textiles
o Wood and coal

Do not use for:
– Fires involving electrical equipment
– Kitchen fires
– Flammable gas and liquids

How water extinguishers work:
The water has a cooling effect on the fuel, causing it to burn much more slowly until the flames are eventually extinguished.

Types of premises/business who may need water extinguishers:
– Buildings constructed of wood or other organic materials
– Premises where there are organic materials to be found such as:
o Offices
o Schools
o Hospitals
o Residential properties
o Warehouses

In fact most buildings need either water or foam extinguishers.

Where to locate water extinguishers:
– By the exits on a floor where a Class A fire risk has been identified

Water spray extinguishers – what’s the difference?:
Water spray extinguishers are equipped with a spray nozzle, rather than a jet nozzle, meaning a greater surface area can be covered more quickly and the fire put out more rapidly.

Water mist extinguishers – what’s the difference?:
Water mist extinguishers have a different type of nozzle again which releases microscopic water particles. These particles ‘suffocate’ the fire and also create a wall of mist between the fire and the person using the extinguisher, reducing the feeling of heat.

Foam Extinguishers

Overview:
Foam extinguishers are most common type of fire extinguisher for Class B fires, but also work on Class A fires as they are water-based.

Label Colour:
– Cream

Use for:
– Organic materials such as:
o Paper and cardboard
o Fabrics and textiles
o Wood and coal
Plus:
– Flammable liquids, like paint and petrol

Do not use for:
– Kitchen fires
– Fires involving electrical equipment
– Flammable metals

How foam extinguishers work:
As with water extinguishers, foam extinguishers have a cooling effect on the fuel. On burning liquids, the foaming agent creates a barrier between the flame and the fuel, extinguishing the fire.

Types of premises/business who may need Foam extinguishers:
– Buildings constructed of wood or other organic materials
– Premises where there are organic materials to be found such as:
o Offices
o Schools
o Hospitals
o Residential properties
o Warehouses
– Buildings where flammable liquids are stored

In fact most buildings need either water or foam extinguishers

Where to locate foam extinguishers:
– By the exits on a floor where a Class A or Class B fire risk has been identified

Dry Powder Extinguishers

Overview:
Standard dry powder extinguishers are also called ‘ABC’ extinguishers because they tackle class A, B and C fires, however they are not recommended for use in enclosed spaces. This is because the powder can be easily inhaled, and also the residue is very difficult to clean up after. ABC powder extinguishers can also be used on some electrical fires. Specialist dry powder extinguishers are used for flammable metals.

Label Colour:
– Blue

Use for:
– Organic materials such as:
o Paper and cardboard
o Fabrics and textiles
o Wood and coal
Plus:
– Flammable liquids, like paint and petrol
Plus:
– Flammable gases, like liquid petroleum gas (LPG) and acetylene
Plus:
– Fires involving electrical equipment up to 1000v

Specialist dry powder extinguishers are only used on flammable metals, such as titanium and magnesium.

Do not use for:
– Fires involving cooking oil
– Fires involving electrical equipment over 1000v
– or in enclosed spaces, such as offices or residential properties

How dry powder extinguishers work:
Dry powder extinguishers smother fires by forming a barrier between the fuel and the source of oxygen.

Types of premises/business who may need Dry Powder extinguishers:
– Businesses using flammable gases for chemical processes
– Premises where welding and flame cutting takes place
– Garage forecourts
– Liquid petroleum gas (LPG) dispensing plants
– Premises with large, commercial boiler rooms

Where to locate Dry Powder extinguishers:
– Place dry powder extinguishers near to the source of the fire risk.

Specialist Dry Powder extinguishers – what’s the difference?:
Specialist dry powder extinguishers work in the same way as standard dry powder extinguishers but are for use with flammable metals only. There are 2 types of specialist dry powder extinguishers – ‘L2’ which only tackles lithium fires, and ‘M28’, for all other flammable metal fires.

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Extinguishers

Overview:
CO2 extinguishers are predominantly used for electrical fire risks and are usually the main fire extinguisher type provided in computer server rooms. They also put out Class B fires (flammable liquids, such as paint and petroleum).

Label Colour:
– Black

Use for:
– Flammable liquids, like paint and petrol
– Electrical fires

Do not use for:
– Kitchen fires – especially chip-pan fires
– Combustible materials like paper, wood or textiles
– Flammable metals

How CO2 extinguishers work:
CO2 extinguishers suffocate fires by displacing the oxygen the fire needs to burn.

Types of premises/business who may need CO2 extinguishers:
– Premises with electrical equipment, such as:
o Offices
o Kitchens
o Construction sites
o Server rooms

All work vehicles should also carry a smaller 2kg CO2 extinguisher.

Where to locate CO2 extinguishers:
– Place near to the source of the fire risk and/or near the fire exits.

Wet Chemical Extinguishers

Overview:
Wet chemical extinguishers are designed for use on Class F fires, involving cooking oils and fats.  They can also be used on Class A fires although it is more usual to have a foam or water extinguisher for this type of fire risk.

Label Colour:
– Yellow

Use for:
– Cooking oil/fat fires
– Organic materials such as:
o Paper and cardboard
o Fabrics and textiles
o Wood and coal

Do not use for:
– Flammable liquid or gas fires
– Electrical fires
– Flammable metals

How wet chemical extinguishers work:
Wet chemical extinguishers create a layer of foam on the surface of the burning oil or fat, preventing oxygen from fuelling the fire any further. The spray also has a cooling effect.

Types of premises/business who may need CO2 extinguishers:
– Commercial kitchens
– Canteens

Where to locate CO2 extinguishers:
– Place near to the source of the fire risk.

Remember safety first.  Always have a safe escape route planned and get out before its too late.

October is fire prevention month

10/4/2016 (Permalink)

If you do have a fire SERVPRO can help get you back home as soon as possible.

Did you know that if a fire starts in your home you may have as little as two minutes to escape? During a fire, early warning from a working smoke alarm plus a fire escape plan that has been practiced regularly can save lives. Learn what else to do to keep your loved ones safe!

Top Tips for Fire Safety

  1. Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, inside bedrooms and outside sleeping areas.

  2. Test smoke alarms every month. If they’re not working, change the batteries.

  3. Talk with all family members about a fire escape plan and practice the plan twice a year.

  4. If a fire occurs in your home, GET OUT, STAY OUT and CALL FOR HELP. Never go back inside for anything or anyone.

It is also recommended to replace smoke alarms every five years.  Find more info here http://www.redcross.org/mo2g

In case of fire

9/12/2016 (Permalink)

Call SERVPRO @ (989)835-5015 for all your fire and water damage and restoration needs.

If you ever find yourself is a fire situation here are a few tips to help you make it out safely. 

  • Remain calm
  • If you smell smoke, activate fire alarm.
  • Follow exit route procedures for your location.  Make sure to feel a door before opening.  If it is hot do not open it.  Look for another exit.  If there is none remain where you are and call for help.  IF it is not hot, proceed through the door.  Close the door behind you to help isolate the fire.
  • Assist those who may not be able to exit on there own if it will not put you at additional risk.  
  • Do not use elevators.
  • If the area fills with smoke drop to the floor and crawl to the nearest exit or smoke free area.  
  • Once your in a safe area call 911.

You should only attempt to fight a fire if the following conditions exist:

  • If the fire is small and self contained.
  • You are safe from toxic smoke.
  • You have a means of escape.
  • Your instinct tells you it is OK.

You should flee a fire if:

  • If the fire is spreading rapidly or is a large fire.
  • You are unsure of how to operate the fire extinguisher.
  • The fire could block you escape route.

Remember Safety First!   Even a small fire can spread rapidly. An entire house can be engulfed in 3 minutes. You need to have a plan and be ready to act fast.

Do you know how to use a fire extinguisher.

9/12/2016 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin is available for any fire or smoke damage cleanup.

SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin Counties would like to provide you with some valuable knowledge in the event of a small fire.  If you are not in danger and feel that you can safely attempt to extinguish the fire, remember the acronym PASS to help you activate the extinguisher successfully.  

  • Pull the pin at the top of the extinguisher that prevents the handle from being pressed.
  • Aim the nozzle at the base of the fire.
  • Squeeze the handle to release the extinguishing agent.  
  • Sweep foam from side to side at the base of the fire.

 Watch for re-ignition and repeat the steps if necessary.  

It is a good idea to have fire extinguishers conveniently located on each floor of your home or business as well as areas a fire may break out. Kitchens, Laundry rooms and mechanical rooms are common locations.   As always remember safety first and if a fire is too large it is always best to leave the area and call 911 immediately.     

July 15, 2016 is Pet Fire safety day.

7/11/2016 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Midland / Gladwin counties is always ready to help if you have a fire or water damage.

New Data Says Pets Start Nearly 1,000 Fires Each Year -

 SERVPRO Of Midland / Gladwin Counties wants all of you pet owners to know these important facts.  An estimated 500,000 pets are affected annually by home fires, however, nearly 1,000 house fires each year are accidentally started by the homeowners’ pets, according to a new data analysis by the National Fire Protection Association.

The American Kennel Club® (AKC®) and ADT Security Services have joined forces once again for the third annual National Pet Fire Safety Day (July 15) to spread awareness about how pets can start home fires but more importantly how to prevent them.

"Not many pet owners realize that their pet can actually be the cause of a devastating fire," said AKC spokesperson Lisa Peterson.  "Simple preventative measures, such as flameless candles and stove knob covers, can mean the difference between life and death for your four-legged friends."

Chris and Kay Wardlow of Oklahoma know that all too well.  Their curious dog Lucy was home alone and spied a cake on the stove top. As Lucy tried to get a taste, her paw accidentally hit the stove knob and turned on the gas burner that was under the cake pan. Within minutes, the house was filled with smoke, triggering the Wardlow’s ADT monitored smoke detector. Firefighters were called to the scene, the house was saved and Lucy was rescued.

"Planning for unexpected emergencies like home fires and taking these precautions are an integral part of responsible pet ownership," Peterson said.


AKC® and ADT offer the following tips to educate pet owners on how to prevent your beloved pet from starting a fire, as well as how to keep your pets safe.

PREVENT YOUR PET FROM STARTING FIRES

  • Extinguish open flames - Pets are generally curious and will investigate cooking appliances, candles, or even a fire in your fireplace. Ensure your pet is not left unattended around an open flame and make sure to thoroughly extinguish any open flame before leaving your home.
  • Remove stove knobs - Be sure to remove stove knobs or protect them with covers before leaving the house. According to the National Fire Protection Association, a stove or cook top is the number one piece of equipment involved in your pet starting a fire.
  • Invest in flameless candles – These candles contain a light bulb rather than an open flame, and take the danger out of your pet knocking over a candle. Cats are notorious for starting fires when their tails turn over lit candles.
  • Beware of water bowls on wooden decks – Do not leave a glass water bowl for your pet outside on a wooden deck.  The sun’s rays when filtered through the glass and water can actually heat up and ignite the wooden deck beneath it. Choose stainless steel or ceramic bowls instead.     

Keep your pets safe

  • Keep Pets Near Entrances When Away From Home – Keep collars on pets and leashes at the ready in case firefighters need to rescue your pet.  When leaving pets home alone, keep them in areas or rooms near entrances where firefighters can easily find them. 
  • Secure Young Pets - Especially with young puppies, keep them confined away from potential fire-starting hazards when you are away from home such as in crates or behind baby gates in secure areas.
  • Since Pets Left Alone Can’t Escape a Burning Home – Consider using monitored smoke detectors which are connected to a monitoring center so emergency responders can be contacted when you’re not home. These systems provide an added layer of protection beyond battery-operated smoke alarms.
  • Affix a Pet Alert Window Cling – Write down the number of pets inside your house and attach the static cling to a front window. Thiscritical information saves rescuers time when locating your pets.  Make sure to update the number of pets listed.

 Below are some resources to help you keep your pets safe.  Also know that in the event of a disaster SERVPRO is here to help.

In partnership with the National Volunteer Fire Council, pet owners can obtain a free Pet Fire Safety Window Cling on National Pet Fire Safety Day, July 15th at local volunteer firehouses nationwide. For a list of locations, visit www.nvfc.org/windowclings.  The clings are also free online at www.adt.com/pets and will be available this September at your local AKC Responsible Dog Ownership Day.  This year’s flagship event will be held in Raleigh on September 25th.  Visithttp://www.akc.org/clubs/rdod/ for more information on an event near you.  Additionally the clings will be available at Meet the BreedsTM, October 16th and 17th at the Jacob Javits Center in New York City. For more information, visit www.meetthebreeds.com.